Total & Gaussin Creating World’s 1st Fully Electric Aircraft Fuel Truck

Credit to Author: Cynthia Shahan| Date: Tue, 26 May 2020 00:29:38 +0000

Energy giant Total Group and engineering firm Gaussin are working together to create the world’s first 100% electric fuel truck for the aviation industry

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NASA & Uber Working On Our Urban Air Mobility Future

Credit to Author: Nicolas Zart| Date: Fri, 01 Nov 2019 23:10:38 +0000

NASA logo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NASA_insignia#/media/File:NASA_logo.svgNASA and Uber are working to tackle the future of our urban air mobility (UAM) needs. The focus is on the future for city transport for both people and packages transported by air

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The Airbus Vahana Flies

Credit to Author: Nicolas Zart| Date: Sat, 26 Oct 2019 01:00:33 +0000

Airbus Vahana battery swap. Photo: https://vahana.aero/a-look-inside-vahana-flight-testing-2b97446bbbc7Airbus electric vertical takeoff and landing (eVTOL) development might not be as fast-paced as startups’ development, but it is making progress nonetheless. Here’s what’s new with the Airbus Vahana e

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Why Are Tourist Airplanes So Loud?

Credit to Author: Nicolas Zart| Date: Thu, 17 Oct 2019 02:27:26 +0000

Brice Canyon. Photo: Nicolas ZartAfter an 11-day hike around Zion Canyon, Brice Canyon, and the Grand Canyon, one thing became clear. Why are tourist parks and monument aviation so loud? We need quieter and cleaner electric mobility

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Is Kitty Hawk Introducing Range Anxiety For eVTOL Aircraft With Its Heaviside?

Credit to Author: Nicolas Zart| Date: Sun, 13 Oct 2019 03:50:50 +0000

Kitty Hawk Heaviside HVSD eVTOLWe finally heard about Kitty Hawk’s “secret project,” which sports the strange name of Heaviside. It introduces the notion of range for an electric vertical take-off & landing (eVTOL) aircraft. The demonstration of the aircraft flying is fantastic but I wonder if we’re about to witness another “range anxiety” war between eVTOL manufacturers? Let’s hope not

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Boeing acknowledges flaw in 737 MAX simulator software

Credit to Author: jespinosa| Date: Sun, 19 May 2019 03:10:18 +0000

(FILES) In this file photo taken on March 28, 2019 Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are parked on the tarmac after being grounded, at the Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, California. - Boeing acknowledged on May 18, 2019 that it had to correct defects in its flight simulator software used to train pilots to fly the 737 MAX, the aircraft model involved in two deadly crashes that killed 346 people. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP)

Boeing acknowledged Saturday it had to correct flaws in its 737 MAX flight simulator software used to train pilots, after two deadly crashes involving the aircraft that killed 346 people.

The post Boeing acknowledges flaw in 737 MAX simulator software appeared first on Inquirer News.

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