Solar, Wind, Coal, Nuclear, & Nat Gas US Electricity Generation Changes 2010–2020

Credit to Author: Zachary Shahan| Date: Tue, 23 Mar 2021 03:57:29 +0000

How has US electricity generation from solar power, wind power, coal power, natural gas, and nuclear shifted in the past 11 years? Let me show you.

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Renewables = 20.6% of US Electricity in 2020

Credit to Author: Zachary Shahan| Date: Mon, 08 Mar 2021 00:09:32 +0000

2020 US electricity generation data are in from the US Energy Information Administration. Crunching the numbers, renewable energy accounted for 20.6% of US electricity generation last year. That was led by wind power, which accounted for 8.3% of US electricity generation, followed by hydropower at 7.2% and solar power at 3.3%. As reported last month, […]

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Revenue-to-Cost Ratios for Solar PV & Natural Gas — U.S. EIA Forecast by Region & Overall

Credit to Author: U.S. Energy Information Administration| Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2021 00:00:32 +0000

Editor’s note: Note that this evaluation does not take social, environmental, or public health costs into account, and natural gas comes with high social, environmental, or public health costs. Those costs, for the most part, are not priced into power plant costs in the United States. A supplemental report to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s […]

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US Coal Capacity Factor Dropped From 67.1% In 2010 To 47.5% In 2019

Credit to Author: Zachary Shahan| Date: Mon, 22 Feb 2021 17:23:22 +0000

After publishing some recent reports on US power capacity additions and forecasts, one of our readers pushed for more attention on how capacity factors are changing as well as capacity. For those of you new to the topic, here’s a brief definition of capacity factor from the US Energy Information Administration (EIA): “The ratio of […]

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Nuclear & Coal Will Account for Majority of U.S. Generating Capacity Retirements in 2021

Credit to Author: U.S. Energy Information Administration| Date: Tue, 12 Jan 2021 15:16:03 +0000

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) latest inventory of electric generators, 9.1 gigawatts (GW) of electric generating capacity is scheduled to retire in 2021. Nuclear generating capacity will account for the largest share of total capacity retirements (56%), followed by coal (30%)

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U.S. Renewable Energy Consumption Surpasses Coal For 1st Time In Over 130 Years

Credit to Author: U.S. Energy Information Administration| Date: Fri, 01 Jan 2021 02:05:26 +0000

In 2019, U.S. annual energy consumption from renewable sources exceeded coal consumption for the first time since before 1885, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Monthly Energy Review. This outcome mainly reflects the continued decline in the amount of coal used for electricity generation over the past decade as well as growth in renewable energy, mostly from wind and solar

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US Non-Hydro Renewables Grow 6.2%, Provide 11.4% Of US Electricity

Credit to Author: Joshua S Hill| Date: Wed, 30 Oct 2019 17:55:16 +0000

A new analysis of recently released data from the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) by the SUN DAY Campaign has highlighted the fact that renewable energy sources accounted for 18.49% of US electrical generation during the first eight months of 2019 — up from 17.95% a year earlier. 

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